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Monday, September 26, 2011

The Joy of Observing Learners-September 27, 2011


Dear Sexton Mt. Families:                                                                                                 
            As I stepped into Kim Parson’s room during the first minutes of the day, students were identifying the attributes of polygons.  They were drawing angels, naming rays and comparing and contrasting different shapes.  Do you know what a quadrangle with two pairs of parallel sides, all right angles that is not a square is called?  Fourth graders do.  They also know how to discuss mathematical terms with partners and defend their thinking OR change their thinking if presented with a compelling argument.  When I think back to my fourth grade experiences, I’m sure that all I remember is doing page after page after page of computation.  I don’t recall being asked to think so deeply, make generalizations based on a set of attributes or develop a logical argument to persuade others to come to similar mathematical conclusion. 
            One of the fourth grade classrooms was quietly taking a math test but the others were all working from the Everyday Math adoption.  By the time I reached Mr. Shotola’s classroom students had dry erase boards out and were drawing and labeling different polygons.  They would show their work for the teacher to see then describe attributes of the polygon they were creating.  In Mrs. Stratton’s class, students were matching attributes to geometry terms.  A team I observed defined each term in their own words, discussed qualities of the terms based on their own understanding and came to consensus on definitions.  Great things are happening in our school during the first part of the day.
            In other parts o fthe school, Mrs. Tanksley’s fifth graders were identify interrogative and declarative sentences. Mayri and Garris were working on life cycle posters and comparing and contrasting cheetahs and jaguars.  Jacob was writing about a camping trip in Mrs. Martin’s class as soft music played in the background.  Jane was working with a team of classmates in Mr. Hayhurst’s class to write to 1000.  Mr. Morgan’s students were discussing the reasons for writing.  In the first grade area, our Literacy Team (made up of Julie Fryer, Debbie Simmons, Mary Kramer) did reading fluency assessements witn individual first graders.  Our school is abuzz with learning!
            In addition to all the teaching that is going on, this is the time of year when we are learning about your students.  Members of our Literacy Team are working with individual students to determine what each child knows and is able to do.  This one minute assessment is administered to students in kindergarten through fifth grade. In the computer lab, students will also complete a comprehension component and a math component.  The assessment tool we are using this year is called Easy CBM and replaces DIBELS.  These snapshots of learning provide us with information about how our children are doing compared to other students their age or grade level.  The information, along with Developmental Reading Assessments (DRA) and informal classroom asessments, will help teachers inform and differentiate (or tailor) instruction. These assessments will be done each trimester and provide us with information that we are able to use to determine how much an individual child has grown or changed and how close he or she is to meeting or exceeding benchmarks.  Because EasyCBM is new to us this year, I am not sure just yet what individual reports will be available for us to share with parents.  I hope that we will be able to have something to share with you but do keep in mind that these “snapshots” of learning are meant to be just a part of a child’s “scrapbook of learning,” so don’t put too much importance on any one score. 
            One thing that parents often ask after they receive information about a reading assessment is, “What can I do to help my child be a better reader?”  As with anything, the best way to become more proficient at a skill is to practice.  I’ve enjoyed reading classroom newsletters and I’m happy to see that most teachers are expecting students to read or be read to each day.  A study by R.C. Anderson revealed that the students who scored in the 98%ile or above on national reading tests read about 60 minutes a day outside of school.  When I read this study I thought of my own children.  One of my kids does very well on reading tests and in looking at that child’s day I found that reading happened at least 60 minutes a day  when we added up time spent reading at the breakfast table, in the car, before bed, and just about any time there’s a free minute.  This study challenged me to create home reading opportunities for my other kids as well.  I know that scoring well on tests is not my main objective for students but a pleasant product of strong skills.  As a parent, I want my kids to read well so they can have access to information.  I want them to know how to read with a healthy skepticism.  I picture them reading to solve problems, to relax  or to learn new things.  I know that readers are leaders and I want my own kids, as well as my students, to have unlimited possibilites because they are empowered with the skills needed for future success.
            Thank you for making my first month at Sexton Mountain so pleasant. 

Fondly,


Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal

Reminders and FYI

Sign Up for E-News
If you would like to have the newsletter sent electronically to your family (thereby saving paper), please send an email to Teresa_Clemens-Brower@beaverton.k12.or.us with “newsletter and your child’s name” in the subject line. You can also follow the news on my blog. Check out it out at http://cb-principalsperspective.blogspot.com.

Traffic Flow
Thanks for the friendly, patient attitudes at arrival and dismissal each day.  Thank you for following established traffic patterns.  Thank you for pulling as far forward as possible before dropping or picking up students. Thanks for teaching children the safest routes to walk.  Thanks for being so very, very patient!  As the weather changes this fall, there will be more traffic at dismissal time so practicing patience now will prepare us for the rainy days ahead!


Talented and Gifted Testing
Every year students are considered for Talented and Gifted services in Beaverton School District.  These services are provided by your child's classroom teacher(s).  If you think your child might qualify, you may wish to complete the Parent Information Form which is available in our school’s office.  Completing this form gives our school TAG committee more information about your child, but it is not required.  All qualified students will be considered regardless of its completion.
Oregon law and District policy define gifted students as those who score at or above the 97th percentile on a standardized, nationally normed test of mental ability and/or academic achievement.  Behavioral, learning, and/or performance information is also considered before a student is identified for TAG services.  The Parent Information Form must be completed and returned to our school’s TAG facilitator, Michele Cobain, or the school’s office.

Student Verification Form
Please review your child's Student Verification form and complete or correct all missing or erroneous information.  Pay particularly close attention to your address, phone number, zip code, emergency information and employment.  Sign the form and return it to school as soon as possible.

Monday, September 19, 2011

Must Be Present to Win- 9/20/11


Dear Sexton Mt. Families:                                                                                             

Have you ever entered a contest where one of the rules was that you must be present to win?  The same rule applies to school.  If a child is not here for instruction, they miss out on the great prize of learning!  In order for kids to benefit from every minute of learning, they must be in class each morning by 8:30.

At 8:30 a.m. on Friday I did a very fast walk around the building.  Kindergarten students were working on fine motor skills with handwriting practice.  First graders were writing sentences in response to a question.  Second graders were spelling science vocabulary words.  Third graders and fourth graders were working on math.  Fifth grade classes were going over the criteria for a written report.   The first minutes of the day are not wasted in an elementary school.  Every minute counts!

On my way back to the office one child after another greeted me as they had just arrived and were late to class. I checked over attendance logs for the week and on any given day, between 15 and 30 students arrived after 8:35.  Yikes!   A few minutes here and a few minutes there certainly can add up over the course of year.  If a child is late to third grade once, they might miss 10 opportunities to practice mathematics.  If they are late five times they miss fifty opportunities.  If you do the math (given that you were present for third grade multiplication instruction J) you can see how quickly missed instruction adds up.  Elementary school is about building skills as well as stamina for future instruction.  Kids must be present to develop this habit.

One thing I’ve noticed about our parking lot is that the flow goes very smoothly between 8:05 and 8:15 a.m. but by 8:20 a.m. things are getting a bit congested.  At 8:30 it’s bumper to bumper so I am assuming there are kids in cars instead of class.  I wonder if every family had the goal of being on campus by 8:08 if ALL our kids would do great during the first minutes of learning. 

If you attended Back to School Night last week, you know that our District has high expectations for kids.  Our aim is for 100% of our kids to be learning at high levels.  College and career readiness requires a strong foundation that builds from kindergarten.  That all (a.k.a. 100%) students will be prepared for post-secondary education and career success seems like a lofty District goal, but when I asked parents last Thursday if they expected any less of their children, not a single parent raised their hand. You can learn more about what students are expected to know and be able to do by checking out grade level learning targets at http://www.beaverton.k12.or.us/home/departments/instruction/. 

Last Thursday night, I shared with parents that about 80% of our students are reading at the level needed for College and Career Readiness (CCR). In the area of mathematics, 58% of our students are performing at the level needed for CCR and 64% of our students in writing.  About 35% of our kids have reading, math AND writing skills firmly in place.  We have important work to do and need kids in class in order to meet the goal.

In Mrs. Spidal’s third grade classroom last Friday, she worked with a small group of children, as others were lost in books.  Chronicles of Narnia, Magic Treehouse, and Spiders are Not Insects were just a few of the titles I observed kids reading.  Learners knew the objectives of their reading time. Trevor noted that building stamina, or the ability to stay on task while reading, was an important skill for becoming a better reader.  Leah noted that concentrating on the book builds comprehension.  Kids in this class know that following a chapter, you write about the chapter to prove to yourself that you understand what you are reading.  Manuel knew that good readers reread the text if they don’t understand what they read.  As the observer, I noticed that kids were taking responsibility for their learning as they self-monitored.  As texts become more complex as students grow older, this practiced skill will still be applied.   Great things are happening in our classrooms each day!  Thank you for sharing your children with us.
Fondly,

Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal


Reminders and FYI

Sign Up for E-News
If you would like to have the newsletter sent electronically to your family (thereby saving paper), please send an email to Teresa_Clemens-Brower@beaverton.k12.or.us with “newsletter and your child’s name” in the subject line. You can also follow the news on my blog. Check out it out at http://cb-principalsperspective.blogspot.com.

Talented and Gifted Testing
Every year students are considered for Talented and Gifted services in Beaverton School District.  These services are provided by your child's classroom teacher(s).  If you think your child might qualify, you may wish to complete the Parent Information Form that is available in our school’s office.  Completing this form gives our school TAG committee more information about your child, but it is not required.  All qualified students will be considered regardless of its completion.
Oregon law and District policy define gifted students as those who score at or above the 97th percentile on a standardized, nationally normed test of mental ability and/or academic achievement.  Behavioral, learning, and/or performance information is also considered before a student is identified for TAG services.  The Parent Information Form must be completed and returned to our school’s TAG facilitator, Michele Cobain, or the school’s office.

Student Verification Form
Please review your child's Student Verification form and complete or correct all missing or erroneous information.  Pay particularly close attention to your address, phone number, zip code, emergency information and employment.  Sign the form and return it to school as soon as possible.

Candidates sought for school Community Engagement Committees
Sexton Mountain School is seeking candidates interested in applying for Community Engagement Committees (CEC). Each committee will be comprised of 3 – 5 individuals from our school and local community. The primary responsibilities for Community Engagement Committees are to assist the principal with outreach and engagement of the local community, serve as a communication link between the school community, principal and School Board, and determine use of school property. Individuals interested in applying need to reside and/or work, and reflect the diversity within the school attendance area, or for options schools, the District attendance area. The school principal will appoint the committee members. Candidates should complete an application (available from school office), and may also include a resumé and/or letter of interest. Application deadline is Monday, Oct. 17, 2011. Send completed application materials directly to the school office.  For more information, please contact the school office.

Nagleri Testing
In October, all 3rd and 5th grade students in the Beaverton School District will be administered the Naglieri Nonverbal
Ability Test (NNAT2). The NNAT2 assesses school learning ability without requiring a student to read, write or speak.
Instead, students rely on reasoning and problem solving skills to complete the test items.
The NNAT2 results may be used to screen general ability for students whose school performance may be hindered by
limited English proficiency. The test is also used as one screening factor for eligibility for District programs, such as
Talented & Gifted and Summa. The results of the NNAT2 will be distributed to parents in December. For more information, please contact Michele Cobain, TAG facilitator.


Saturday, September 17, 2011

College and Career Planning

This week I was asking kids what they want to be when they grow up. A second grader really thought hard about the question then decided he would like to be one of the guys who pumps gas at the gas station because people give them a TON of money...or he said, "Maybe a crayon factory worker."  I have the best job!

Monday, September 12, 2011

Writing About Treasure



September 13, 2011


Dear Sexton Mt. Families:                                                                                                  

On Sunday we moved our daughter into a dorm at Oregon State University. Driving away, leaving her behind, knowing it would be several weeks before we see her again, I felt a bit sad.  My pity party continued up I-5 until almost Woodburn when I realized that she was well prepared for her independence and I could be confident in her success. It seems like just the other day she was off to kindergarten but we’ve been preparing for independence and her journey to college and adulthood since birth.  Encouraging her to be a caring human, a creative problem solver, responsible, respectful and safe, all started long ago. I can also confidently say that the Beaverton School District prepared her academically for college success.

Accordingly to David Connelly, a researcher on college and career success, one of the academic skills students need in order to be successful for post-secondary success is writing.  Throughout the year, our staff and students will be working on refining writing instruction and improving writing skills.  We will do school-wide writing projects and work to make instruction from one grade level to the next seamless so that our students have a strong foundation for middle school.

You probably already know the project that we are doing this month.  Students have been invited to bring a treasure to write about. My “treasure” is a small flashing light I wear on my hat each morning when I walk.  The light represents my daily hour of “me time” with a friend.  Side by side, we walk through my dark neighborhood and talk while my flashing light alerts drivers to our presence.   Teachers’ treasures represented a range of memories from first marathons to tenth triathlons. From pizza tins to special blankets, teachers shared and modeled the art of crafting a tale about their treasure.

Third grade teacher Weise Spidal was holding a sand dollar in her palm.  Twenty-four third graders sat on the floor leaning forward to catch every detail of the story of her treasure.  Long ago, her boys had gone to the beach and brought back a special treat for their mom.  Students made connections to the story then turned knee to knee to share their own stories of special treasures.  Matthew and Nishanth sat knee-to-knee and almost nose-to-nose to share their ideas. Each listening to the other with eager anticipation, they shared, listened, questioned and clarified.

At lunch, Susanna and Kasech, second graders, talked about their treasures.  Kasech had a special book, given to her by members of her church when she was sick. In a second grade way, she described how the book represented the caring and compassion of a community coming together to show love. Susanna talked about a special book of photos and pictures that represented special memories of family time.  Both had long stories with lots of details about their item.  I happened to visit the classroom later when Susanna shared her shiny treasure with the class and the teacher talked about “watermelon ideas” versus “seed ideas.”  From the big ideas that her treasure represented, the things that Susanna had talked about at lunch, she was able to narrow her topic to one moment in time, one ride at Disneyland that represented her love of family memories.

In Kim Parson’s class, fourth graders helped describe her special treasure.  Olivia was able to take the teacher’s story of finding a treasure on the beach in Maui and add concise words to help the listener imagine what it would be like to walk on a sandy beach and come upon something special.

Fifth grader, Brynn shared a puppet and how it represented a special trip.  Her teacher strategically asked questions that narrowed the topic from a big family adventure to one moment in time during a puppet show.  In the same class, Michiko shared a worn pair of ballet slippers.  Though the slippers represented her years of dedication of learning the art of dance, she was able to narrow her memory to the moment in time when she was on stage and her whole family was there to see the fruits of her labor.  In another class, students learned how to use a graphic organizer to plan writing.

Through this shared experience, we hope to teach children that clarity and details make writing more interesting for the reader or audience.  This writing trait is referred to as “Ideas and Content.”  “Ideas and Content” are in a sense the heart of writing.  Everything that is said comes back to ideas and content. Making a topic clear and manageable is so important.  Details can make or break a piece.   Currently in Oregon, six different traits are analyzed and we’ll focus on these throughout the year.  A description of each of the six traits follows. 
1.     Ideas and Content-Writing should be clear, focused and interesting.  The piece should hold the readers attention.  The main ideas stand out and are developed by supporting details suitable to audience and purpose.
2.     Conventions-Writing should demonstrate strong control of standard writing conventions (e.g., punctuation, spelling, capitalization, grammar and usage) and uses them effectively to enhance communication.  Errors are few and minor.  Conventions support readability.
3.    Voice-The writer has chosen a voice appropriate for the topic, purpose and audience.  The writer demonstrates commitment to the topic and there is a sense of “writing to be read.”  The writing is expressive, engaging or sincere.
4.    Organization-The organization enhances the central idea and its development.  The order and structure are strong and move the reader through the text.
5.    Word Choice-Words convey the intended message in an interesting, precise and natural way appropriate to audience and purpose.  The writer employs a broad range of words that have been carefully chosen and thoughtfully placed for impact.
6.    Sentence Fluency-The writing has an easy flow and rhythm.  Sentences are carefully crafted, with strong and varied structure that makes expressive oral reading easy and enjoyable.

The Beaverton Literacy targets in writing break down what kids need to know and be able to do at each grade level for each trait.  The grade level targets for  “Ideas and Content” in writing are below.   

Kindergarten
·       Write unconventional simple messages or directions for a specific reason; purpose; or person (Audience/Purpose)
·       Write unconventional brief stories that use drawings to support meaning and labels objects and places (Main Idea)
First Grade
·       Write with assistance, write for different purposes and to a specific audience or person (Audience/Purpose)
·       Develop an idea with an identifiable beginning, middle and end (Main Idea)
·       Use descriptive words when writing (Description/Detail, Transitions)
Second Grade
·       With guidance make reasonable judgments about what to include in written compositions (Audience/Purpose)
·       Group related ideas.  Develop an idea with an introductory sentence, supporting sentences and a concluding sentence (Main Idea)
·       Select and use descriptive words when writing (Description/Detail, Transitions)
Third Grade
·       Write appropriately for purpose and audience (Audience/Purpose)Group related ideas to maintain a consistent focus (Main Idea)
·       Begin to elaborate descriptions (Description/Detail, Transitions)
Fourth Grade
·       Choose the form of writing that best suites the intended purpose (Audience/Purpose)
·       Focus on a central idea, excluding loosely related, extraneous, and repetitious information (Main Idea)
Fifth Grade
·       Choose the form of writing that best suites the intended purpose (Audience/Purpose)
·       Focus on a central idea, excluding loosely related, extraneous, and repetitious information (Main Idea)
·       Provide details and examples to support ideas.  Provide transitions to link paragraphs (Description/Detail, Transitions)

Writing is a process!  Children and adult writers alike can often feel paralyzed by the idea of perfection. If a child has an idea of what their end product might look like then they look at a blank page, it may seem impossible to go from nothing to capturing all the ideas they have.  Writing is one area that is so open ended that it’s often hard for a child to even begin.  We recognize this and will provide plenty of supports but we won’t expect perfection.  We will expect kids to work hard and we will accept their best effort. We want kids to value the process and gain independence as writers so they grow into knowing how to independently produce their own best work.   As parents, you will get to see the progression of work over time with different writing assignments.  In our hallways, expect to see best effort but not perfection.  
Help us celebrate the process.

Families can do several things to support this process.  Help your child develop oral language by talking.  From recounting the events of the day to describing a sunrise, your spoken words provide the vocabulary for the written word.  Help your child build writing stamina by encouraging them to write daily.  Write favorite songs or poems.  Write lists.  Write about the adventures of the day.  Write plans for the future.  Write about the books you are reading, games you’re playing or what’s for dinner.  Just 15 minutes a day can build the muscle and mind memory to make assigned writing pieces easier.  Practice makes proficient.  At school, parents can volunteer to listen to students share writing.  We will also need volunteers to display writing in our hallways.  Let your child’s teacher know if you are able to put up bulletin boards or can offer encouragement to a young author.  We also hope to have a range of adult writers come to visit our students throughout the year so if you or someone you know is a writer, let us know.  We’d like our kids to learn from you.

Relationships are the heart of teaching and learning.  I have enjoyed this first week of getting to know your children through their stories and treasures. Natalie wrote a lovely note about the difference between bison and buffalo.  Elly shared with me a lunch-box story her mom is writing for her.  It’s so interesting to learn about the lives of kids through their interests and stories.  We are off to a great start!  Thank you for sharing your children with us.  I’ll see you Thursday at Back to School Night.

Fondly,

Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal

Reminders and FYI

Sign Up for E-News (190 paper Copies of this Newsletter Already Saved!)
If you would like to have the newsletter sent electronically to your family (thereby saving paper), please send an email to Teresa_Clemens-Brower@beaverton.k12.or.us with “newsletter and your child’s name” in the subject line. You can also follow the news on my blog. Check out it out at http://cb-principalsperspective.blogspot.com.

FYI-Flip Flop Injuries Reported
Our custodian has noted a correlation between flip-flops and falling kids.   Flip-flops don’t seem to stay on the feet as well as sneakers.

September 15              Back To School Night (Curriculum Night) 6:30-8:00pm
During this important evening, you will have a chance to hear about our school and each classroom’s curricular goals.  We will start in the gym for a short presentation unlike any you’ve seen before on Back to School Night.   Teachers will hold three sessions with identical content so that families with more than one child can plan accordingly.  Thanks in advance for walking to school that night if you can since parking is often tight.
6:30-6:50-Presentation in the Gym
6:50-7:10-Session 1     7:15-7:35-Session 2     7:40-8:00-Session 3
           
Student Verification Form
Please review your child's Student Verification form and complete or correct all missing or erroneous information.  Pay particularly close attention to your address, phone number, zip code, emergency information and employment.  Sign the form and return it to school as soon as possible.

District Goal for 2010-2015:  All students will show ­­­continuous progress toward their personal learning goals, developed in collaboration with teachers and parents, and will be prepared for post-secondary education and career success.
The Beaverton School District recognizes the diversity and worth of all individuals and groups.  It is the policy of the Beaverton School District that there will be no discrimination or harassment of individuals or groups based on race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, marital status, age, veterans' status, genetic information or disability in any educational programs, activities or employment. 
Sexton Mountain Elementary School n 15645 SW Sexton Mountain Drive n Beaverton, Oregon 97007 n Office: 503.672-3560 n FAX 503.673-3563

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Principal's News-Week 1-9/6/11

September 6, 2011


Dear Sexton Mt. Families:                                                                                        

The first day of school was fabulous!    As I visited classrooms today, it was a delight to see kids hard at work.  In kindergarten, future architects and engineers were hard at work building things. In Mr. Shotola’s room, artists learned about perspective and light source.  Mrs. Baldwin’s first graders were encouraging one another to learn lunch codes.  Students listened for the beat in music and learned how to treat books in library.  Students practiced new routines, like where to put lunch pails or line up, and made new friends. In second grade, Mr. Hayhurst’s students listened to a story about the importance of sticking with it to finish strong. Fifth graders were engaged in a project about the meaning of their name.  It was an exciting day indeed!  Thank you for sharing your children with us!

Before School
Students should plan on going to classrooms now at 8:30a.m.  Before school, beginning at 8:10, students may go to the cafeteria, playground or gym.

Thank You Ice Cream Social Volunteers!

Thanks to the PTC for sponsoring the Ice Cream Social last week.  Families certainly enjoyed reconnecting over a special treat.  Thanks especially to Heather Hough for her hard work in organizing the event, recruiting volunteers and making sure that every last drop of sticky stuff was mopped up off the floors.

Staff Changes

We continue to make staffing adjustments.  Please join me in welcoming the following:
q  Jannette Wesner has joined our staff as our English as a Second Language (ESL) teacher.  Jan has a background as a reading teacher, ESL teacher and is known for challenging students to think deeply.  Jan replaces Meg Sundseth who accepted a position in Oregon City.
q  Pam Duhrkoop will serve as our evening custodian. Pam replaces Bill Coker who accepted a position at McKinley School.

Sign Up for E-News (180 Copies of this Newsletter Already Saved!)
Each week I will send home a letter telling you about what’s happening at Sexton Mountain.  We send a paper copy home with the youngest or only child in each family OR families can also opt to go paperless and have the newsletter sent electronically.  If you would like to have the newsletter sent electronically to your family, please send an email to Teresa_Clemens-Brower@beaverton.k12.or.us with “newsletter and your child’s name” in the subject line. You can also follow the news on my blog. Check out it out at  http://cb-principalsperspective.blogspot.com.

Local Option Levy
The severe recession has caused the Oregon Legislature to reduce basic operating funds for K-12 schools statewide. In the last four years, the Beaverton School District has reduced its budget by $105 million. The Beaverton School Board will ask voters to consider a five-year Local Option Levy on the Nov. 8, 2011 ballot.

The Local Option Levy would provide the District with additional operating funds to help offset staff and program reductions, help maintain class size and protect basic academic programs.  The Local Option Levy could raise approximately $12-16 million per year. Over a five-year period, it could generate nearly $70 million for the Beaverton School District.

Upcoming Events


September 7              First Day of School for Kindergarten students with last name Beginning with M-Z
                        Kindergarten Students with last names Beginning with A-L do not come to school on this day
                         

September 9                Volunteer Orientation Meeting at 9:30am

Come to this informational meeting to learn about volunteer opportunities at our school.

 

September 9                PTC Meeting at 10:00am       

Come to this informative first general meeting to learn about the ways the PTC is enriching the lives of our children.

 

September 15             Back To School Night, 6:30-8:00pm
During this important evening, you will have a chance to hear about our school and each classroom’s curricular goals.  We will start in the gym for a short presentation unlike any you’ve seen before on Back to School Night.   Teachers will hold three sessions with identical content so that families with more than one child can plan accordingly.  Thanks in advance for walking to school that night if you can since parking is often tight.
6:30-6:50-Presentation in the Gym
6:50-7:10-Session 1
7:15-7:35-Session 2
7:40-8:00-Session 3

September 27                        Picture Day
           
Student Verification Form
Please review your child's Student Verification form and complete or correct all missing or erroneous information.  Pay particularly close attention to your address, phone number, zip code, emergency information and employment.  Sign the form and return it to school as soon as possible.
Thank you!
We've had a fabulous start to our school year thanks to the efforts of many! Our school rocks!

All my best,

Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

Fantastic First Day


The first day of school was fabulous!    As I visited classrooms, it was a delight to see kids hard at work.  In kindergarten, future architects and engineers were hard at work building things. In Mr. Shotola’s room, artists learned about perspective and light source.  Mrs. Baldwin’s first graders were encouraging one another to learn lunch codes.  Students listened for the beat in music and learned how to treat books in library.  Students practiced new routines, like where to put lunch pails or line up, and made new friends. In second grade, Mr. Hayhurst’s students listened to a story about the importance of sticking with it to finish strong. Fifth graders were engaged in a project about the meaning of their name.  It was an exciting day indeed!  Thank you for sharing your children with us!