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Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Report Cards and Parking-November 25, 2014



Dear Sexton Mt. Families:                                                                                                                                                               

On Monday, December 1, students will not come to school because it is a Teacher Workday.  On that day, teachers will be working on report cards.   Today marks the end of the first grading period.  Report cards will be sent home on December 9.  The report card will look a bit different than last year.  You will notice that changes are minimal.   Please note that the report card shows proficiency on year-end targets.  You will use the academic key to see how your child is progressing toward what they are expected to know at the end of the year.  Do pay close attention to the Trimester Progress Key as it shows if your child is making the progress we would expect in order to meet end of year targets.

Academic Key:
4=Highly proficient
3=Proficient
2=Nearly Proficient
1=Developing
N/A=Not Assessed this trimester
**  Modified Curriculum/Assessment

Trimester Progress Key
This is the area to pay close attention to since it shows if your child is making the progress we would expect in order to meet end of year targets.
+  significant
   steady
  minimal

Based on the REST of my message today, you might think I’ve only been in the parking lot the last few days.  However, this is the time of year when we tend to have more parking lot issues and we’ve had several new families join us recently so I wanted to re-share some information from earlier in the year.

GETTING TO SCHOOL on time and ready to learn sets the stage for the day.  When the rain starts or when there is ice on windshields in the morning, we tend to have a more congested parking lot and therefore, if families don’t plan ahead, more students arrive after instruction begins.

Please know that supervision in the cafeteria begins at 8:05am and at 8:10 students can also go to the gym, playground or library, if space is available.  Traffic is very light at 8:05am.   It is a perfect time to bring students to school.

Because our parking lot can get CONGESTED it is important to follow the established traffic patterns.

IF students are able to independently get in and out of the car on the passenger side, they can be dropped off in the front circle. 

Students can be dropped off and picked up curbside only in the front traffic circle.  The picture below shows how buses ONLY will drop students in the AM bus lane and cars will remain in the through lane.   There is no bus lane in the afternoon so cars can pull along the curb at the end of the day.  They still must only load kids in the front circle.  The cars below illustrate the before school routine perfectly!


In the front circle, cars should pull forward to the end of the curb if there is room.  The daycare van pictured below is a perfect example of this!  If cars pull forward like this, we are able to have 9 cars at a time unload children and this makes for a faster drop off.
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Notice how the cars pictured below have students exiting only on the passenger side.  They’ve left just enough room between cars to easily pull away from the curb and into the imaginary lane that runs parallel to the drop off lane, making for a smooth traffic flow.  Put your car in park while your child gets out then wait to pull away until the child is on the curb.  This allows the driver to be sure that cords on jackets or backpack parts aren’t trapped in the car door.


Once on the sidewalk, students enter through the door closest to the cafeteria then go to the cafeteria, gym, library or playground until 8:25am.   At 8:25, the front doors will be open and students may go directly to class.

IF students are not yet able to be dropped curbside independently, drivers should park in a legal parking space then help the child out of the car and walk them across the crosswalk to the building.  The child can then go to the cafeteria, gym, library or playground until 8:25am. If adults come into the building with children, they need to enter through the front door then go to the office to sign in and get a visitor or volunteer badge.

Know that Instruction Begins promptly at 8:30am -When the 8:25am bell rings, students walk directly to the classroom.  Teachers take attendance electronically at 8:30am then begin instruction, so if a child arrives after the 8:30am bell, the child will be marked absent.  As to not interrupt instruction, children not in class at 8:30am need to get a pink slip from the office.  When they show this to the teacher, the teacher knows that the office has changed the electronic record to show the child is at school.  Please make being on time and ready to learn a habit.  Children who are frequently tardy in elementary school are more likely have poor grades in middle school, drop out in high school, and even experience employment issues later in life.  Plan ahead for congestion and let kids know that the start of the day is a lot like the scheduled departure of an airplane to Disneyland in that if you arrive late, you may miss something important, no matter what the excuse. 
THE END OF THE DAY can be congested too.  Please be patient and follow the law.   One of our parents snapped the picture below showing where a car had parked on 155th Avenue in front of the school.  By not parking legally, traffic was essentially stopped.  Our neighbors behind the school have reported cars parked in the no parking zone on 158th and expressed concern about how this is not only illegal but creates blindspots for kids who may be crossing the street.   Our staff members DO NOT direct traffic on public streets but we can report dangerous or illegal behaviors to Beaverton City Police just as you can.  

Your children are dear to us and we want to maximize our time with them.  Making sure they get to school safely and are in class by 8:30am when instruction starts is important for everyone.

Fondly,

Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal

Wish List-These are things or jobs that make a difference to our kids, teachers or school. Send in items or let Mrs. CB know if you can volunteer.
·       We need 2 wagons to add to our LUNCH WAGON collection.  
·       Donations of Sports Illustrated for Kids, Ranger Rick, Highlights, LegoMagazine, Zoo Books, American Girl and more will be put to good use.
Upcoming Events
November 26, 27, 29-Thanksgiving Break-No School
December 1-Grading Day-No School

December 5-PTC Music Program (Thanks to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Sexton Mt. Drive and 154th for opening their parking lot to us for overflow parking for this event.)

December 9-PTC Meeting at 6:30pm
December 22-January 2-Winter Break- No School
January 5- School Resumes
January 13-PTC Meeting at 9:00am
January 18-Martin Luther King Jr. Day-No School
January 26-Staff Development Day-No School
February 16-Presidents’ Day-No School
February 19-20 Parent-Teacher Conferences-No School
March 12 Kindergarten Orientation
March13  Grading Day - No School
March 23-27-Spring Break-No School

Reminders (Article below were included in previous newsletters.)
  
Facebook-Are you on Facebook?  Stay connected by liking the Principal CB’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Principal-CBs-Page-Sexton-Mountain-Elementary/227153960776053
Remind 101--Text @drcleme to 81010 to receive text messages regarding “breaking news” for our school.

Twitter--Are you a Twitter user?  Follow us at https://twitter.com/PrincipalCB
 
District Goal for 2010-2015:  All students will show continuous progress toward their personal learning goals, developed in collaboration with teachers and parents, and will be prepared for post-secondary education and career success.
The Beaverton School District recognizes the diversity and worth of all individuals and groups.  It is the policy of the Beaverton School District that there will be no discrimination or harassment of individuals or groups based on race, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, marital status, age, veterans' status, genetic information or disability in any educational programs, activities or employment. 


Sexton Mountain Elementary School n 15645 SW Sexton Mountain Drive n Beaverton, Oregon 97007 n Office: 503.672.3560 n FAX 503.672.3538

Monday, November 17, 2014

Building Vocabulary Through Reading-November 18, 2014

Dear Sexton Mt. Families:

There is nothing better than watching teachers teach and learners learn!  I happened to be in Mr. Pfaff’s room recently as he was teaching students to use context clues to understand the meaning of words.  He taught rich vocabulary and thinking skills by reading aloud to students then having them discuss. Mr. Pfaff pointed out that the author used the word scamper and scurry. He asked students to think about how the words were similar or different? He then reread a portion of the text with those words and had students quietly think about the meaning.

In the discussion that followed, students talked about the words and used EVIDENCE from the text to defend their thinking.  While all children were engaged in discussing the meaning of words with a partner and building shared vocabulary, Mr. Pfaff called on just a few kids to share with the whole group.  Here is one comment that reflected the type of thinking I heard. 

I thought scampering was not in a straight line  (from his spot on the carpet he moves his body back and forth to show his thinking of scamper) but it says,  ‘they scampered out from the sideboard carefully hugging the wall.   When I think about hugging the wall, they are going along the line of the wall so they are probably going in a straight line.

Our objective is to create life-time readers.  College and career ready students will continue to read and educate themselves through life. Reading aloud to students is a great source of brain building. The words a child hears helps the child make sense of written words later in life.  We read aloud to our children to inform, arouse curiosity and inspire.  Reading aloud creates background knowledge, builds a “book vocabulary and provides conditions for a child to associate reading with pleasure.  Because human beings are pleasure-centered, we want children to take JOY in reading so they do it often.  Reading is an accrued skill.  The more you read, the better you get.   Reading is the one skill that contributes to success in all other content areas. Readers must show a steadily growing ability to discern more from and make fuller use of text including making connections among ideas and between text, considering a wider range of textual evidence and becoming more sensitive to inconsistencies, ambiguities and poor reasoning in texts.

Mr. Pfaff’s lesson on using context clues to support a better understanding of words is a perfect example of a skill we want students to develop.  Imagine how joyless reading could become if every time an unknown word occurred, the reader had to stop and look the word up in a dictionary.  Imagine how long it would take to read directions for changing a furnace filter or instructions for putting on tire chains if you had to stop and look up each unfamiliar word.   Imagine your child as a college freshman, assigned 500 pages of reading for the week and not having the ability to efficiently read for deep meaning and understanding. 

The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for Language Arts  show the specific literacy skills and understandings required for college and career readiness in multiple dimensions.  The CCSS defines a grade-by-grade staircase of  increasingly complex skills students must obtain in order to be at the college or career readiness level by graduation.

The Smarter Balanced Assessment is based on the CCSS.  Third, fourth and fifth grade students will take this assessment this spring.   This will require students to construct responses using evidence from the text.  Here is an example of what students may be expected to do after reading a passage about hermit crabs.

Read the sentence and the directions that follow.
The hermit crabs in the ocean have learned to adapt to the changing housing situation.
Using details from the text, define the word adapt and explain how crabs have adapted.

I predict that since teachers are using read-aloud discussions, students will be able to find evidence in the text to support thinking about the definition of different words.   I’ve observed rich text-based discussions in kindergarten classes and beyond.  Please use the time you read aloud to your child for rich discussion.  Use audio books to spark conversation.   By age 5, students in homes where books are read and discussed have heard 45 million words compared to just 13 million in language poor homes.  Reading regularly helps close the gap.  That is why we do it at school and why we encourage you to read TO your child and WITH your child at home too.

I want to emphasize that CCSS are all about systematically building the skills and habits of mind needed in order to be successful in a wide range of post-secondary options. Rigorous standards beginning in kindergarten were designed to raise student proficiencies so the United States can better compete in a global market.  The standards provide uniform expectations for students across the country and they highlight the skills needed in real life.  Though I will include sample test questions throughout the year, it is important to remember that the skills are life-long skills.  While it’s important to know how they are assessed, the assessment is not as important as the skill and how it relates to life.

An enthusiastic pre-schooler left the building Monday morning with a few new books in hand.  She was VERY excited to start reading.  It’s this type of enthusiasm we hope to see in all our readers and it was clearly evident that her family has already started her on the right path.  The books she had were from Mrs. Bartlett’s class Book Sale.  The proceeds from this community service project will benefit homeless youth. A service project that allows books to be recycled into good homes while providing support for those in need is pretty cool.  I’m reminded daily that Sexton Mountain School is a great place to learn!  Thank you for sharing your children with us!

Fondly,

Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal

Thank you!
·       Thanks to those who continue to donate children’s magazines for the cafeteria reading bins.  Students really enjoy the variety of materials families are sharing!
·       Thanks to Saralyn Dougal for helping secure extra parking spaces for us our Winter Music Program.
·       Thanks to Kate Kristiansen and her team of volunteers for putting on the dance last Friday.  Students had so much fun and it was nice to see adult family members getting to know one another too.
·       Thanks to all who donated used books for Mrs. Bartlett’s class Book Sale.  

Wish List-These are things or jobs that make a difference to our kids, teachers or school. Send in items or let Mrs. CB know if you can volunteer.
·       We need 3 wagons to add to our LUNCH WAGON collection.  If you have one to donate, we can put it to good use.
·       Our students LOVE to read kid magazines in the cafeteria.  Donations of Sports Illustrated for Kids, Ranger Rick, Highlights, LegoMagazine, Zoo Books, American Girl and more will be put to good use.
·       Donations of folding card tables can be put to good use for special lunch times on the stage.
Upcoming Events
November 26, 27, 29-Thanksgiving Break-No School
December 1-Grading Day-No School

December 5-PTC Music Program (Thanks to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Sexton Mt. Drive and 154th for opening their parking lot to us for overflow parking for this event.)

December 9-PTC Meeting at 6:30pm
December 22-January 2-Winter Break- No School
January 5- School Resumes

Reminders (Article below were included in previous newsletters.)

Music Program--December 5 is the Winter Music Program. First through fifth graders will perform during this evening event.

Facebook
Are you on Facebook?  Stay connected by liking the Principal CB’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Principal-CBs-Page-Sexton-Mountain-Elementary/227153960776053

Remind 101--Text @drcleme to 81010 to receive text messages regarding “breaking news” for our school.

Twitter--Are you a Twitter user?  Follow us at https://twitter.com/PrincipalCB

 

Monday, November 10, 2014

Mindfulness with Technology in our World (reposted from April 2014)

Repost--Mindfulness with Technology in our World-April 15, 2014


Dear Sexton Mt. Families:  

This morning on the news, there was a segment about an accidental Tweet that had been sent by a business to thousands of people.  It was one more reminder about how technology is changing our world and was a great opportunity for me to discuss with my son what to do the second one realizes a message is inappropriate. Over my past ten years as a school administrator discipline issues have been pretty similar until the past year or so.  Changes in technology have opened a new world to kids and I wanted to alert all families to some of the things I’m seeing so that you can have a proactive role at home in these changing times.

As a parent, I realize that my own experience as a child have shaped the things I think about.  When I was a child, if I wanted to talk to my friends privately on the phone, I had to stretch the phone cord to the laundry area, sit on the washing machine and close myself into a tiny closet.  There were three television channels to pick from and if it was windy, fewer because our large antennae would be blown around and not pick up the signal. If I wanted to look up the spelling or definition of a word, I would use a dictionary.  If I needed to do research, I’d pull out an encyclopedia.  To access books, I’d go to the library.  To find a location, I’d look on a map.  The Sears catalog provided an opportunity to shop without going to a store.  When I was a child, issues with friends were face to face.  Drama between friends happened in person.  Graphic images were not an option because they were sold behind the counter at a store or in theaters that didn’t allow children.  Life is different for our kids.

For our students today, the world is in their pocket.  With a smart phone or tablet, students can access information, entertainment and other people.  With such easy access a wide range of possibilities is now available to our children.  There are many positive things about having the world at our fingertips but also dangers as well.  While there is a lot of information available for parents on Internet safety, I wanted to share a few things that I’ve noticed over the past year and some thinking around it.  Many families may already be aware of these things but most families I’ve shared info with, after something has been brought to my attention at school, have been genuinely surprised that kids might be having experiences at such young ages.  Please note that these are my personal observations and I offer no solutions BUT I think it’s important that families are aware and I’ve given some things to think about.  Know that students as young as 5 have been referred to the office for almost every area noted.

§  Passwords-Students share many things but passwords should not be something they share.  You may want to talk about this with your child and share strategies you use for keeping important passwords secure.

§  Devices-Some kids have phones or tablets and some don’t.   For the most part, phones have been stolen more than any other item this school year.  When phones are brought to school, they need to be off and away.   When kids brag about phones, show them to others or if they ring during class, this alerts others to the device’s presence.  You may want to teach our children to be mindful of their own property.  For the many students who do not yet have phones, families should let them know why your family has made that decision.  I predict that in the near future, kids will be invited to bring their own device to school for projects.  You may want to think about how you keep your devices secure as you are out and about and share these strategies with your child.  When kids share their devices with others they need to be mindful of how it is being used.  I have had conversations with students when their phone sent bad words to others’ phones when it was not in their possession.  You may want to think about how you will teach your child to prevent things like that from happening.


§  Texting -Kids love to text.  They love to take selfies and send them to others.  Teach children that any message they send can be forwarded to others. Unlike the paper notes of my day that could be passed around to a few, texts can be sent to thousands in a short period of time.  Teach children to be mindful of their words and the images they send.  Remind children that any body part covered by a swimsuit should not be photographed.  Think about how you will teach your child to set limits.  Texts don’t just distract drivers but they can distract during homework, learning, family time, playing and more.  You may want to think about how will you teach your child about what is urgent or important? Think about what you would like your child to do if they receive an inappropriate text.

§  Social Media-If you have a social media account you likely know that some users are positive, some are negative and some are downright mean.  Again, most anything posted can be shared so teach children to be mindful about what they post.  Too many times to count, kids have been shocked when I pull up a message they have sent.  They are amazed that the principal can see their words and they clearly have not thought about who might see it.  You may want to think about how you will share this message with your child.  Some families say, if you wouldn’t write it to Grandma you shouldn’t write it to a friend.  A middle school colleague sent me a picture with guidelines for users.


§  Visual Images-The first time one of my elementary students told me he and a group of friends had viewed pornography, I was almost physically ill.  A group of kids had been at home looking something up and somehow stumbled across it but it pulled them in and they watched it several times.   It was brought to my attention because they were talking to one another about it at school.  All of the families involved had the same response, “I never thought I’d have to worry about this in elementary school!”

§  Advertising-There is so much advertising on different sites.  Teach kids to be mindful.

§  Relationships-Online “friends” through gaming sites, social media sites or elsewhere seem to be popping up more and more. For some, the whole idea of what it means to have or be friend has changed over the years.  Is your child starting with human-to-human contact first then adding the online component?  Have you talked to your child about the friend of a friend and how to know if that person is safe?   Do their friends know?  Do kids know what to do if something unkind is posted or if exchanged words make them feel uncomfortable?

§  Words-Kids are intrigued by unknown words.  Off limit words (i.e. swear words) are very tempting to look up.  Definitions in paper dictionaries are often confusing for younger readers so they don’t really understand the meaning of a word if they look it up.  Online dictionaries, on the other hand, sometimes add graphic images to show meaning so students have a much better understanding of what the word means.  I tell students that if it seems like a questionable word, talking to a trusted adult is always the best route. 

§  Access-Parents will often have strict guidelines and safeguards in their own home and assume that others do too.  Access to dangerous things, whether virtual or real, may be a reality when your child goes next door.

There are many web-based resources for parents regarding safety.  Though much has changed since I was a child, I know that it was easy to talk with my mom about a wide range of things because we talked often.  Establishing open communication with your child now will certainly make it easier as they grow older and the topics become more complex. 

Fondly,

Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

State Report Card, CommonCore, and More-November 4, 2014

Dear Sexton Mt. Families:          

Our school’s Oregon State Report Card Rating was recently published and our school falls within the top 10% in the state of Oregon.  This is exciting news indeed as it recognizes the hard work our students, staff and supporters have put into making our school shine.   While it seems our high rating is used most often by local realtors to sell homes in our area, schools also use the information as one piece in helping to inform instructional decisions.   We disaggregate the data to learn about how we are meeting the needs of different groups of students.  

Our rating is based on a number of factors including:
  • the percentage of students at the school who take the required state assessments
  • the percentage of students who meet or exceed expectations on the assessments
  • the percentage of students in different categories (disaggregated into 14 different categories)  who meet or exceed expectations on the assessments

This snapshot of student achievement is only one of many in our “how are we doing” album, but unlike other assessments we use, this helps us see how our instructional practices are supporting students compared to other students around the state.  As we move toward national Common Core state standards and assessments we will also develop a better understanding of how our students are doing compared to others across the nation as well.

The report card is based on the standardized assessments our third, fourth and fifth graders take but I see examples of how interactions, starting in kindergarten, prepares students to think deeply and critically so they will be ready for a wide range of academic tasks, including state assessments.

There has been much media attention around the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and the Smarter Balanced Assessment.  As a parent, these two terms could be confusing and might make you wonder how they will affect your child’s education.  While the terms are often put together, I will describe them separately because they are indeed two different things.

The Common Core State Standards are standards that define the knowledge and skills students should have K-12.  These Common Core State Standards were developed by forty-eight states, two territories, and the District of Columbia and have had much teacher input in their development.  Previously, Oregon had the Oregon Standards for every grade level.  The Oregon Standards were developed in Oregon so may have differed from the standards that other states had developed.  The Common Core State Standards tell us what students need to know and be able to do at each grade level. The intentional and coherent structure is intended to develop rich content knowledge and help students build the habits of mind that are essential to their future success.  You will see the standards put in kid language in the learning targets or learning goals posted in the classrooms.  Here is an example of targets from a kindergarten classroom.



Visit this link to browse the Beaverton Learning Targets

Teachers at all grade levels teach the Common Core State Standards.  They gather information about a child’s progress toward the standards in a variety of ways.  The formal and informal assessments used inform the teacher about the next steps for instruction.  These assessments help us understand how we are doing today compared to yesterday.  The more formal assessments, like Oregon Assessment of Knowledge of Skills (OAKS) provided us with a bigger picture understanding of how our kids are doing compared to those around the state.   In past years, the OAKS math and reading test could be administered up to three times so students could spend hours and hours testing and retesting in order for us to have the highest number of students meet expectations.  This school year, our students in third, fourth and fifth grades will take a different reading and math assessment.

The Smarter Balanced Assessment is one measurement tool that provides opportunities to apply the content knowledge and habits of mind so that we can better understand what students are learning.  The Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium is a team of states, including Oregon, that developed the assessment called Smarter Balance.  This spring Smarter Balance will replace the Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS) that was previously used to assess the Oregon standards.  The Smarter Balanced English Language Arts/Literacy and Math assessments have an on-line portion and a classroom performance task portion.  The assessments are more rigorous than the OAKS assessment as the Common Core Standards are more rigorous. Unlike OAKS, students will only have one chance to take the SBAC so it’s likely that our students may spend less time testing than they have in past years.  More information about the SBAC will be in future newsletters.  You can find sample tests at http://sbac.portal.airast.org/practice-test/.

It has always been interesting to me that previously every state in the United States could develop their unique standards and assessments.  Many developed countries have moved to national standards and common assessments, so as a country they can compare results and work on initiatives.  I think that the Common Core State Standards and the Smarter Balanced assessment can better prepare all students across the United States for their future. The goal of the Beaverton School District is to prepare our students for a wide range of post secondary and career options.  The Common Core State Standards provide the intentional and coherently structured framework to help our students build the skills to THINK crucially and creatively, KNOW important content, ACT collaboratively and GO into the local and global community to change the world.  The Smarter Balanced assessment will give us information about how we are doing this along the way.  

Last month I did a presentation on this topic to interested parents.  I shared some strategies that families can use to support the habits students will need for the new expectations. Using EVIDENCE to support thinking is likely the most important habit you can instill in your child.  Asking a child to give reasons to support an opinion develops REASONING skills. 

I see examples of this every day as I visit classrooms. Our teachers are asking students to develop their thinking by looking for evidence in the text, explaining their thinking or building on the thinking of others.  Last Friday, I happened to visit a classroom as students were having a serious discussion comparing bats and birds. They used evidence from the text and were knocking my socks off with their depth of knowledge. The teacher asked a question about what bats use in order to navigate at night. First graders were asked to share their idea with a neighbor before raising their hand. A neighbor in front of me whispered, "echolocation" and my neighbor to the right whispered into my ear, "a flashlight."  By providing opportunities for students to share their ideas, kids were able to build a new understanding.  By finding evidence in the text, and comparing that to other texts about whales, kids built new vocabulary and a better understanding as well.  Sexton Mt. has great teachers working hard to support students.  Thank you for supporting our teachers as they support your children!

Fondly,

Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal

Thank you!
·       Thanks all who put so much effort into planning great fall parties for our kids!  We have amazing volunteers.
·       Thanks to Amy Stewart for donating kids’ magazines for our cafeteria reading tubs.  Kids certainly enjoy reading these!

Wish List-These are things or jobs that make a difference to our kids, teachers or school. Send in items or let Mrs. CB know if you can volunteer.
·       We need 3 wagons to add to our LUNCH WAGON collection.  If you have one to donate, we can put it to good use.
·      Are you a woodworker?  We’d love to have someone make a sign for our 155th and Sexton Mtn. entry with the name of our school and our address. 
·       Have you noticed the new “stained glass window” in the library.  This decorative vinyl blocks the sun so makes it easier for students to see the screen during presentations.  We hope to cover another window or two as well.  Donations of Wisteria Decorative Window Film (available at Home Depot) will be put to good use in our library.  We could use three more panels.
·       Our students LOVE to read kid magazines in the cafeteria.  Donations of Sports Illustrated for Kids, Ranger Rick, Highlights, LegoMagazine, Zoo Books, and more will be put to good use.
·       Donations of folding card tables can be put to good use for special lunch times on the stage.

Upcoming Events
November 10-Staff Development Day-No School
November 11-Veterans’ Day-No School
November 13-PTC Meeting at 9:30am
November 14-PTC Family Dance
November 26, 27, 29-Thanksgiving Break-No School
December 1-Grading Day-No School
December 5-PTC Music Program
December 9-PTC Meeting at 6:30pm
December 22-January 2-Winter Break- No School
January 5- School Resumes

Reminders (Article below were included in previous newsletters.)

Music Program
December 5 is the Winter Music Program. First through fifth graders will perform during this evening event.

Facebook
Are you on Facebook?  Stay connected by liking the Principal CB’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Principal-CBs-Page-Sexton-Mountain-Elementary/227153960776053

Remind 101
       Text @drcleme to 81010 to receive text messages regarding school closures or weather related delays and other “breaking news” will be shared this way.

Twitter
Are you a Twitter user?  Follow us at https://twitter.com/PrincipalCB