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Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Reporting Progress-December 1, 2015

December 1, 2015
                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
The purpose of today’s newsletter is to:
·    Inform you about the student report card
·     Share strategies for goal setting with your student


Dear Sexton Mt. Families:

A friend is planning a trip to a tropical island next summer.  She found that stepping on the scale on Monday, November 30 (after a holiday associated with food) was disheartening BUT she quickly changed her attitude to reflect her growth mindset.  She acknowledged the point in time measure, refocused on her summer goal then reflected on her learning from the food filled weekend.  She shared that she has 202 days until her trip including 4 holidays and a birthday.  She plans to increase her time exercising and use better strategies around special occasion eating in order to rest assured that she will be where she hopes to be physically by the time the school year ends.

I share this story because students will bring home report cards via backpack mail by December 8.  Teachers recorded the point in time progress of students as of the November 30 workday. Use the report card to inform you about how your child is progressing and to help your child set goals. Perhaps you need to set goals to increase the time your child spends exercising his or her brain (by reading or writing) and develop some strategies for areas that are a bit more difficult (planning for big projects or avoiding the distraction of screen time).  Know that you have about 200 days until the end of the school year, so plan to make the most of every minute, but don’t freak out.  Instead, have a solution focused attitude.   Help your child set goals.  Personal goals help motivate, energize, and focus students, and goal setting is a valuable skill that will benefit learners throughout their lives.

The purpose of the report card is to:
·       communicate a student’s academic achievement or progress toward District learning targets.
·       separately communicate a student’s use of key academic behaviors that are critical to student success.
·       indicate areas of strength and areas where additional time and effort are required.

This report summarizes information in three areas:
        1. Behavior Progress: How a student learns.
        2. Academic Performance: What a student has learned.
        3. Learning Progress: How a student is progressing.

BEHAVIOR PROGRESS
This section of the progress report addresses those classroom behaviors that are key to school success, such as managing responsibilities and communicating with others. A student will receive a C, G or R to indicate current performance in each area:
        C--Consistently
        G--Generally
        R--Rarely/Sometimes (Needs Improvement)

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE
This progress report provides information on your student's current level of performance in Reading, Writing, Language, Speaking and Listening, Mathematics (all aligned to the Common Core State Standards) and Science, Social Studies, Health, Physical Education, Music, and Visual Arts.  A student will receive a 4, 3, 2, or 1 to indicate current performance in each area, based on the end of the year grade level expectations.  The scoring guide or rubric, which provides a description of each level (1-4) for each learning target, can be viewed on the district website or obtained through the teacher. A "1" should be accompanied by a teacher comment or additional communication.  An X is used when an area has not been assessed or when there is not enough information. 
        4--Highly Proficient
        3--Proficient
        2--Nearing Proficiency
        1--Developing

LEARNING PROGRESS
This section describes your student's progress over time.  A student may be performing below expectations for a grade level but still have made significant progress during the trimester. Alternately, a student may be performing at or above standard academically, but only making minimal progress.  It is important that students of all developmental abilities are making steady or significant progress.  A student will receive either a  +  =  or  -  to indicate current progress in each area:
        +   for significant progress
        =   for steady progress
        -   for minimal progress

If you have questions or concern, you  are encouraged to contact the classroom teacher or the PE or Music teachers for marks in those subject areas.

Dr. Teresa Clemens-Brower
a.k.a.  Mrs. C.-B.
Principal

Wish List-These are things or jobs that make a difference to our kids, teachers or school. Send in items or let Mrs. CB know if you can volunteer.

Donations of Sports Illustrated for Kids, Ranger Rick, Highlights, Lego Magazine, Zoo Books, American Girl and more will be put to good use.

Donations of foaming hand soap dispensers (empty or full) will be put to good use

Upcoming Events
Dec. 21-Winter Break Begins
Jan. 4-School Resumes

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